bann2

BUTTERHEAD LETTUCE

SOIL

The best soil for this type of harvest is rich in organic substances, light, and fertilised during the autumn-winter period. The butterhead variety can also adapt to dry, less rich soil.

SOWING

Before sowing, the soil needs to be dug over several times and left to breath. It needs to be levelled immediately after sowing.

IRRIGATION AND FERTILISATION

Water in periods of drought, bearing in mind that irrigation needs to be constant and never missed, as this causes the plant to flower early. To fertilise lettuce, we use ripe manure. If the soil has any shortcomings, we add potassium by means of ash or a specific product.

PLANT PROTECTION

Sometimes fieldmice or voles can damage the roots when digging their holes. Leaves are subject to being eaten by slugs and snails. Lettuce is exposed to this danger throughout its life cycle. Keep the soil well aired by regularly hoeing between the rows and keeping weed growth in check. The soil needs to be kept wet during the driest periods and the important thing is to keep watering throughout the dry period or the plant will flower early.

LOLLO VERDE

SOIL

Lollo verde needs fertile, well-drained soil with a good water supply. It is essential for the soil to contain organic substances that will give the plant the right amount of moisture and an excellent availability of nutritional elements, plus a low level of salinity.

SOWING

The best period is while the moon is waxing, as this stimulates plant development.

IRRIGATION AND FERTILISATION

After sowing, the soil needs to be fertilised with a nitrogen-based product after around 10-15 days. For excellent yield, the fertiliser needs to include organic compost, phosphorous and potassium, and inorganic fertilisers.

PLANT PROTECTION

The main diseases that can affect lollo verde, like all other types of salad, come from soil and leaf parasites, which can infect the roots or neck, causing the whole plant to collapse within a brief amount of time. The only means to combat these diseases (besides chemicals) is to prevent them, which is possible by avoiding planting in infected or waterlogged soil. Diseases not caused by parasites can occur with a browning of the leaf edges, due to water imbalances or excessively saline soil.